Archive for April, 2017

29
Apr

White Wood Bunk Bed Gives An Aesthetic Look To Your Room

Submitted by: James Lister

White is one color which you love to make a part of your life in various ways with white clothes, white shoes, white furniture, etc. White furniture is painted with high quality white color. A white wood bunk bed is painted with the color which includes substances that can avoid any kind of strains sticking to the furniture. The substance in the paint does not allow moisture to enter and hence the strains can be wiped off quite easily. This makes a white wood bunk bed more popular among people who love white furniture. You will surely not purchase a bunk bed frequently, so before buying it, a lot of care has to be taken. The wood used in white wood bunk bed is very strong so that it is quite durable and functional. As it is a bunk bed, the beds are placed one on top of the other so the bottom bed has to carry the top bed on it. Thus, the attachment points are made up of steel, so that the stability is kept perfect. The bunk bed designers have emphasized a lot on these factors which makes the bed a special one for your need.

A white wood bunk bed as the name indicates is colored white, which makes the look of the bunk bed rather royal. Whatever the interior decoration of the room is, the white color is very versatile as it looks good in every respect. If your room has lot of vibrant colors around, then the white wood bunk bed is absolutely the right choice whereas any light shaded room like peach, lemon yellow, etc. can also match up very well with the white color bunk bed. The bunk beds are a favorite with children and are also space efficient as they occupy lesser space than normal beds. The bunk beds are available in various forms like futon bunk beds, twin over full bunk beds, twin over twin bunk beds, etc. You can select one depending upon the need. A futon bed can be taken if you want to convert your bed into a couch during the daytime or a twin over full bunk bed can be selected in case your child needs more space to sleep at night. Thus, a white wood bunk bed is designed in a huge variety of models for you to choose from.

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The bunk beds are delivered in small parts separately and you will have to assemble the white wood bunk bed in your room. The top bed of the white wood bunk bed has a wooden border with a certain height to protect the child against a fall. The bunk beds come equipped with a stairway for you to climb the top bed. The staircase is either straight or slanting depending on the model and style of the bunk bed that you choose. This allows children and even older people to move up and down the bunk bed very comfortably.

About the Author: James is an expert in the field. For

white bunk beds

and for more enquiry on

bunk beds

Please visit: http://www.bunkbedsnow.com

Source:

isnare.com

Permanent Link:

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29
Apr

Sir Alex Ferguson: “poor, poor performance” by match officials after Chelsea defeats Manchester United

Saturday, April 3, 2010

Manchester United F.C. 1 2 Chelsea F.C.

Chelsea defeated rivals Manchester United 2-1 in an English Premier League match today, thereby moving to the top of the league table, two points ahead of Manchester United. Sir Alex Ferguson, manager of the losing side said the match officials were to blame for Manchester’s defeat.

The first half we looked leggy, it took us too long to get going and Chelsea were by far the better team. The second half we did well, we were unfortunate not to get something from the game. We dominated it in the second period but we just didn’t get there.

Chelsea, managed by Carlo Ancelotti, was provided the lead by Joe Cole in the 20th minute. Didier Drogba scored again for the visitors (Chelsea) in the 79th minute. United’s Federico Macheda scored a goal two minutes later. The victory took Chelsea two points ahead of their rivals with five matches in hand for both teams.

Replays of Drogba’s goal showed that the striker was offside. In connection to this, the Manchester United manager commented, “What I can’t understand is the linesman’s directly in front of it. He has no-one near him and he gets it wrong.” He added: “A game of that magnitude, you really need quality officials and we didn’t get them today. It was a poor, poor performance.”

According to Ferguson, Chelsea were the title favorites for this season. “Five games left, they’re two points ahead and four goals better than us – they’re in the driving seat,” he said. “Chelsea are favourites now, there’s no question. I’m certain we’ll respond but we could win the next five games and not win it,” he added.

Chelsea manager, Carlo Ancelotti said that his team “kept a high intensity” in the first half of the match. “We had good control of the game. We trained very well during the week because we didn’t have a Champions League match. You lose a lot of energy. We played very well in the first half. It’s a very important victory for us and a very important performance. To win here is not easy, we did a good job,” he further commented

Ancelotti left out Drogba from the starting team and chose the team that defeated Aston Villa 7-1 last week. “It was very tough to take out Didier but he understood because he trained not 100 per cent during the week. I preferred to put him on during the match and he did very well because he was fresh and he scored a fantastic goal,” the Italian said.

Ancelotti agreed that Chelsea were favorites. He said it was normal as they were back at top of the league standings. “There are five games left and we have to stay focused. We are happy but nothing is decided so we must stay calm and focused on our game. [It has been a] good reaction after the defeat against Inter. My players are strong,” he noted.

Florent Malouda of Chelsea said that it was going to be very difficult to win the championship. “If we play the way we played today, we have a big possibility but it’s going to be very, very hard,” he said.

According to him, Chelsea “wanted to be on top of the league after this game.” He told Sky Sports that “it was hard but I think we played really well and for us it means a lot after the bad week we had. We had to react and we reacted in the best way.”

29
Apr

Messi scores hat-trick as Barça become table toppers

Sunday, January 10, 2016

Yesterday, FC Barcelona collected three points defeating Granada-based football club Granada CF 4–0 at Camp Nou in Barcelona in a La Liga match and became league leaders again.

Barcelona had greater ball possession. The match saw five yellow cards. Four away players and Alexis Vidal of Barcelona were yellow carded. More than thirty fouls were committed in the match. Lionel Messi scored the first goal of the match in the 8th minute, assisted by debutant Arda Turan. Minutes later, Uruguayan Luis Suárez assisted Messi and he netted the second goal in the 14th minute. Rubén Rochina was the first player to be booked in the 29th minute. First half ended in 2–0 with one yellow card shown.

I’m very satisfied with how the team played.

In the second half Edgar Méndez and David Lombán of Granada were booked in 56th and 57th minute. In the next minute, Sergi Roberto assisted Brazilian Neymar whose try to net a goal was saved, but the ball deflected and Messi scored the third goal of the match, completing his hat-trick.

Dória was yellow carded at the 60th minute. Three minuted later, Alex Vidal was yellow carded for a bad foul. Neymar, in the 83rd minute, scored the fourth goal of the match assisted by Suárez.

After the match, Barcelona manager Luis Enrique said “I’m very satisfied with how the team played. Everybody was focused from the beginning and the players knew how important it was to win these three points.”

Also yesterday Zinedine Zidane, recently appointed Real Madrid’s new manager, secured a 5–0 win against Deportivo with Welsh winger Gareth Bale scoring a hat-trick as well.


January 9, 2016
FC Barcelona 4–0 Granada CF Camp Nou, BarcelonaAttendance: 70,720Referee: Carlos Velasco Carballo, Spain
8′ Lionel Messi 14′ Lionel Messi 58′ Lionel Messi 83′ Neymar 63′ Aleix Vidal (2–0) HT 29′ Rubén Rochina 56′ Edgar Méndez 57′ David Lombán 60′ Doria
29
Apr

BDSM as business: An interview with the owners of a dungeon

Sunday, October 21, 2007

Torture proliferates American headlines today: whether its use is defensible in certain contexts and the morality of the practice. Wikinews reporter David Shankbone was curious about torture in American popular culture. This is the first of a two part series examining the BDSM business. This interview focuses on the owners of a dungeon, what they charge, what the clients are like and how they handle their needs.

When Shankbone rings the bell of “HC & Co.” he has no idea what to expect. A BDSM (Bondage Discipline Sadism Masochism) dungeon is a legal enterprise in New York City, and there are more than a few businesses that cater to a clientèle that wants an enema, a spanking, to be dressed like a baby or to wear women’s clothing. Shankbone went to find out what these businesses are like, who runs them, who works at them, and who frequents them. He spent three hours one night in what is considered one of the more upscale establishments in Manhattan, Rebecca’s Hidden Chamber, where according to The Village Voice, “you can take your girlfriend or wife, and have them treated with respect—unless they hope to be treated with something other than respect!”

When Shankbone arrived on the sixth floor of a midtown office building, the elevator opened up to a hallway where a smiling Rebecca greeted him. She is a beautiful forty-ish Long Island mother of three who is dressed in smart black pants and a black turtleneck that reaches up to her blond-streaked hair pulled back in a bushy ponytail. “Are you David Shankbone? We’re so excited to meet you!” she says, and leads him down the hall to a living room area with a sofa, a television playing an action-thriller, an open supply cabinet stocked with enema kits, and her husband Bill sitting at the computer trying to find where the re-release of Blade Runner is playing at the local theater. “I don’t like that movie,” says Rebecca.

Perhaps the most poignant moment came at the end of the night when Shankbone was waiting to be escorted out (to avoid running into a client). Rebecca came into the room and sat on the sofa. “You know, a lot of people out there would like to see me burn for what I do,” she says. Rebecca is a woman who has faced challenges in her life, and dealt with them the best she could given her circumstances. She sees herself as providing a service to people who have needs, no matter how debauched the outside world deems them. They sat talking mutual challenges they have faced and politics (she’s supporting Hillary); Rebecca reflected upon the irony that many of the people who supported the torture at Abu Ghraib would want her closed down. It was in this conversation that Shankbone saw that humanity can be found anywhere, including in places that appear on the surface to cater to the inhumanity some people in our society feel towards themselves, or others.

“The best way to describe it,” says Bill, “is if you had a kink, and you had a wife and you had two kids, and every time you had sex with your wife it just didn’t hit the nail on the head. What would you do about it? How would you handle it? You might go through life feeling unfulfilled. Or you might say, ‘No, my kink is I really need to dress in women’s clothing.’ We’re that outlet. We’re not the evil devil out here, plucking people off the street, keeping them chained up for days on end.”

Below is David Shankbone’s interview with Bill & Rebecca, owners of Rebecca’s Hidden Chamber, a BDSM dungeon.

Contents

  • 1 Meet Bill & Rebecca, owners of a BDSM dungeon
    • 1.1 Their home life
  • 2 Operating the business
    • 2.1 The costs
    • 2.2 Hiring employees
    • 2.3 The prices
  • 3 The clients
    • 3.1 What happens when a client walks through the door
    • 3.2 Motivations of the clients
    • 3.3 Typical requests
    • 3.4 What is not typical
  • 4 The environment
    • 4.1 Is an S&M dungeon dangerous?
    • 4.2 On S&M burnout
  • 5 Criticism of BDSM
  • 6 Related news
  • 7 External links
  • 8 Sources
21
Apr

Mom’s Head To Toe List Five Things To Do Before Summer

By Nicole Dean

Summer is here! Are you prepared to be a sun-loving beauty? This checklist for Summer Preparation will give you a good start for swimsuit season.

Exercise – Ladies, there’s nowhere to hide it anymore. The big, bad cellulite fairy visited during the winter again. Or does cellulite reproduce when it’s cold? Either way, get out your walking shoes and hit the streets. Or grab an exercise video and shake it until it melts off.

Pluck or wax those eyebrows. – The bright sunlight will show every little straggler. There’s nothing worse than looking like Bert in a bikini!

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Swimsuit Shopping – Although most women would rather have a root canal than to go swimsuit shopping, it is a necessary evil. If your options are to go swimsuit shopping or to run around the pool in a worn, baggy, see-through swimsuit – please drag yourself to the store! I’ll be the one hiding in the stall next to you, laughing as I try on yet another swimsuit over my undergarments and try to figure out exactly what I’m looking at.

Body Hair – Let’s face it. Winter is not the time we are most diligent about keeping up with shaving. If you’re dreading another year of shaving, there are many more options these days to choose from — from home waxing kits to laser hair removal.

Feet – Eew! Those scratchy, rough, lizardy-feet need to go away now. Buff them or grab a power sander, but get them looking like skin again before sandal season. Once you’ve got people-feet instead of hobbit-feet, then dust off a bottle of toenail polish, grab a toe-ring, and make them pretty.

Now you’re ready for swimsuit season. Grab a little drink umbrella, drop it into your diet Coke and enjoy your summer, as the sun goddess that you are!

About the Author: Nicole Dean is the mostly-sane mom behind

romanceyourhusband.com/

– ’til death do us part is a loooooooong time. Enjoy it!

Source:

isnare.com

Permanent Link:

isnare.com/?aid=3671&ca=Womens+Interest

21
Apr

French police arrest two women wearing veils after burqa ban goes into effect

Tuesday, April 12, 2011

One day after France began enforcing a ban on the public wearing Islamic veils that cover the face, either a niq?b or a burqa, French police briefly detained two veiled women. The police later claimed that the women were arrested for taking part in an unauthorized protest, not because they were wearing veils.

The new law is hotly debated. The women were arrested while outside the famed Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, and may now face fines of up to $217 (150 euros), community service and/or a citizenship course under the law.

While the ban covers the burqa and the niq?b, it does not include the hijab or the chador. The hijab is a veil that leaves the face visible while covering the hair and neck, and the chador covers only the body.

The French Republic lives in a bare-headed fashion…

The law has stirred much debate, both in France and around the globe. Those who oppose the new law say it limits freedom of speech and freedom of religion, while supporters claim that women are degraded by wearing veils and the law is intended to empower those women, as well as increase public security.

The French government, in defense of the ban, said that it was necessary because wearing veils falls short of the living standards in France and and makes women be of an lower status in a country where everybody is considered equal.

French Prime Minister Francois Fillon has said that the ban is consistent with the national values of France. “The French Republic lives in a bare-headed fashion,” he said in a statement published by a government newspaper.

The French government previously made efforts to accommodate Muslims in the country, including establishing a council dealing with the presence of Islam; however, according to Amer Sahar, a professor who studies the topic, some Muslims in the country say that they feel as though they are under assault by the government. She said that some are “resentful of the fact that they are not allowed to be both Muslim and French.”

The French government is also concerned with women and children who are forced to veil themselves. It has said that such an action is “a new form of enslavement that the republic cannot accept on its soil.” There is a fine of 30,000 euros (about $43,300) and a year in prison for forcing an adult to wear the niq?b or burqa. The fine is doubled for forcing a minor to wear the veils.

Activist Rachid Nekkaz auctioned one of his homes to provide money to pay the fine for any woman arrested under the law. “I would like to send a clear message to President Nicolas Sarkozy that we can do what we want. We have rules. We have a constitution and everyone has to respect it,” he said.

According to the French Constitutional Council, the law “conforms to the Constitution” because it does not limit the freedom of religion or excessively punish people for exercising that right in a place of worship.

21
Apr

Antje Duvekot on life as a folk singer, her family and her music

Sunday, November 11, 2007

Boston-based singer-songwriter Antje Duvekot has made a name for herself in the folk music world with powerful ballads of heartbreak and longing for a deeper spirituality, but coming up empty-handed. Below is David Shankbone’s interview with the folk chanteuse.


David Shankbone: Tell me about your new album.

Antje Duvekot: It’s called Big Dream Boulevard and it’s the first studio album I made. It’s not so new; I made it in May of 2006. It’s produced by Séamus Egan, who is the leader of a fairly renowned band named Solas.

DS: You mentioned you used to explore more dark themes in your work, but that lately you are exploring lighter fare. What themes are you exploring on this album?

AD: In the future I am hoping for more light themes. I feel like I have worked through a lot of the darkness, and personally I feel like I’m ready to write a batch of lighter songs, but that’s just how I’m feeling right now. My last record, Big Dream Boulevard, was a pretty heavy record and that was not intentional. I write what is on my mind.

DS: What were you going through that made it so dark?

AD: The record is drawn from my whole writing career, so it’s old and new songs as well. I wasn’t going through anything in particular because it was spanning a wide time period. I think it’s fair to say that over all I turn to music in times of trouble and need as a therapeutic tool to get me through sadness. That’s why I tend to turn to music. So my songs tend to be a little darker, because that’s where I tend to go for solace. So themes like personal struggle with relationships and existential issues.

DS: What personal relationships do you struggle with?

AD: A lot of my songs are about dating and relationship troubles. That’s one category. But a lot of my songs are about existential questions because I struggle with what to believe in.

DS: Do you believe in a higher power?

AD: I’m sort of an atheist who wishes I could believe something.

DS: What do you believe?

AD: It’s undefined. I think I’m spiritual in music, which is my outlet, but I just can’t get on board with an organized religion. Not even Unitarianism. I do miss something like that in my life, though.

DS: Why do you miss having religion in your life?

AD: I think every human being craves a feeling that there is a higher purpose. It’s a need for me. A lot of my songs express that struggle.

DS: Does the idea that our lives on Earth may be all that there is unsettle you?

AD: Yes, sure. I think there’s more. I’m always seeking things of beauty, and my art reflects the search for that.

DS: You had said in an interview that your family wasn’t particularly supportive of your career path, but you are also saying they were atheists who weren’t curious about the things you are curious about. It sounds like you were a hothouse flower.

AD: Yes. I think what went with my parents’ atheism was a distrust of the arts as frivolous and extraneous. They were very pragmatic.

DS: They almost sound Soviet Communist.

AD: Yeah, a little bit [Laughs]. They had an austere way of living, and my wanting to pursue music as a career was the last straw.

DS: What’s your relationship with them now?

AD: I don’t actually speak to my mother and stepfather.

DS: Why?

AD: A lot of reasons, but when I was about 21 I was fairly certain I wanted to go the music path and they said, “Fine, then go!”

DS: That’s the reason you don’t speak with them?

AD: That’s the main. “Go ahead, do what you want, and have a nice life.” So the music thing cost the relationship with my parents, although I think there may have been some other things that have done it.

DS: That must be a difficult thing to contend with, that a career would be the basis for a relationship.

AD:Yes, it’s strange, but my love of music is perhaps stronger for it because of the sacrifices I have made for it early on. I had to fight.

DS: Would you say in your previous work some of your conflict of dating would have been birthed from how your relationship with your family? How do you see the arc of your work?

AD: My songs are sort of therapy for me, so you can trace my personal progress through them [Laughs]. I think there is some improvement. I wrote my first love song the other day, so I think I’m getting the hang of what relationships are all about. I’m ever grateful for music for being there for me when things weren’t going so well.

DS: Has the Iraq War affected you as an artist?

AD: Not directly, but I do have a few songs that are political. One about George Bush and the hypocrisy, but it’s very indirect; you wouldn’t know it was about George Bush.

DS: How has it affected you personally?

AD: I feel sad about it. People say my music is sad, but it’s a therapeutic thing so the war affects me.

DS: The struggle to be original in art is innate. When you are coming up with an idea for a song and then you all of a sudden stumble across it having been done somewhere else, how do you not allow that to squelch your creative impulse and drive to continue on.

AD: That’s a good question. I started writing in a vacuum just for myself and I didn’t have a lot of feedback, and I thought that what I’m saying has been said so many times before. Then my songs got out there and people told me, ‘You say it so originally’ and I thought ‘Really?!’ The way I say it, to me, sounds completely trite because it’s the way I would say it and it doesn’t sound special at all. Once my record came out I got some amount of positive reviews that made me think I have something original, which in turn made me have writer’s block to keep that thing that I didn’t even know I had. So now I’m struggling with that, trying to maintain my voice. Right now I feel a little dried-out creatively.

DS: When I interviewed Augusten Burroughs he told me that when he was in advertising he completely shut himself off from the yearly ad books that would come out of the best ads that year, because he wanted to be fresh and not poisoned by other ideas; whereas a band called The Raveonettes said they don’t try to be original they just do what they like and are upfront about their influences. Where do you fall in that spectrum?

AD: Probably more towards Augusten Burroughs because when I first started writing it was more in a vacuum, but I think everyone has their own way. You can’t not be influenced by your experience in life.

DS: Who would you say are some of your biggest influences in the last year. Who have you discovered that has influenced you the most?

AD: Influence is kind of a strong word because I don’t think I’m taking after these people. I’ve been moved by this girl named Anais Mitchell. She’s a singer-songwriter from Vermont who is really unique. She’s just got signed to Righteous Babe Records. Patty Griffin just moves me deeply.

DS: You moved out of New York because you had some difficulty with the music scene here?

AD: I feel it is a little tougher to make it here than in Boston if you are truly acoustic folk lyric driven. I find that audiences in New York like a certain amount of bling and glamor to their performances. A little more edge, a little cooler. I felt for me Boston was the most conducive environment.

DS: Do you feel home up in Boston?

AD:I do, and part of that is the great folk community.

DS: Why do you think Boston has such a well-developed folk scene?

AD: It’s always historically been a folk hub. There’s a lot of awesome folk stations like WUMB and WERS. Legendary folk clubs, like Club Passim. Those have stayed in tact since the sixties.

DS: Is there anything culturally about Boston that makes it more conducive to folk?

AD: Once you have a buzz, the buzz creates more buzz. Some people hear there’s a folk scene in Boston, and then other people move there, so the scene feeds itself and becomes a successful scene. It’s on-going.

DS: Do you have a favorite curse word?

AD: [Giggles] Cunt. [Giggles]

DS: Really?! You are the first woman I have met who likes that word!

AD: Oh, really? I’ll use it in a traffic situation. Road rage. [Laughs]

DS: Do you find yourself more inspired by man-made creations, including people and ideas, or nature-made creations?

AD: I love nature, but it is limited. It is what it is, and doesn’t include the human imagination that can go so much further than nature.

DS: What are some man made things that inspire you?

AD: New York City as a whole is just an amazing city. People are so creative and it is the hub of personal creativity, just in the way people express themselves on a daily basis.

DS: Do you think you will return?

In theory I will return one day if I have money, but in theory you need money to enjoy yourself.

DS: What trait do you deplore in yourself?

AD: Like anyone, I think laziness. I’m a bit a hard on myself, but there’s always more I can do. As a touring singer-songwriter I work hard, but sometimes I forget because I get to sleep in and my job is not conventional, and sometimes I think ‘Oh, I don’t even have a job, how lazy I am!’ [Laughs] Then, of course, there are times I’m touring my ass off and I work hard as well. It comes in shifts. There are times there is so much free time I have to structure my own days, and that’s a challenge.

DS: When is the last time you achieved a goal and were disappointed by it and thought, “Is that all there is?” Something you wanted to obtain, you obtained it, and it wasn’t nearly as fulfilling as you thought it would be.

AD: I was just thinking about the whole dream of becoming a musician. I want to maybe do a research project about people’s dreams and how they feel about them after they come true. It’s really interesting. They change a lot. When I was 17 I saw Ani Difranco on stage and I wanted to do that, and now I’m doing it. Now I think about Ani very differently. I wonder how long it took her to drive here, she must be tired; I’m thinking of all the pragmatic things that go on behind the scenes. The backside of a dream you never consider when you’re dreaming it. To some extent, having my dream fulfilled hasn’t been a let-down, but it’s changed. It’s more realistic.

DS: What is a new goal?

AD: Balance. Trying to grow my career enough to make sure it doesn’t consume me. It’s hard to balance a touring career because there is no structure to your life. I’m trying to take this dream and make it work as a job.

DS: How challenging is it to obtain that in the folk world?

AD: There’s not a lot of money in the folk world. In generally right now I think people’s numbers are down and only a few people can make a living at it. It’s pretty competitive. I’m doing okay, but there’s no huge riches in it so I’m trying to think of my future and maintain a balance in it.

DS: Do you think of doing something less folk-oriented to give your career a push?

Not really, I’ve done that a little bit by trying to approach the major labels, but that was when the major labels were dying so I came in at a bad time for that. I found that when it comes to do it yourself, the folk world is the best place to make money because as soon as you go major you are paying a band.

DS: More money more problems.

AD: More money, more investing. It’s a hard question.

DS: What things did you encounter doing a studio album that you had not foreseen?

AD: Giving up control is hard when you have a producer. His vision, sometimes, is something you can’t understand and have to trust sometimes. See how it comes out. That was hard for me, because up until now I have been such a do it yourself, writing my own songs, recording them myself.

DS: What is your most treasured possession?

AD: I’d like to say my guitar, but I’m still looking for a good one. I have this little latex glove. [Laughs] It’s a long story—

DS: Please! Do tell!

AD: When I was in college I had a romantic friend named David, he was kind of my first love. We were young and found this latex glove in a parking lot. We though, “Oh, this is a nice glove, we’ll name him Duncan.”

DS: You found a latex glove in a parking lot and you decided to take it?

AD: Yeah [Laughs]. He became the symbol of our friendship. He’s disgusting at this point, he’s falling apart. But David and I are still friends and we’ll pass him back and forth to each other every three years or so when we’ve forgotten his existence. David surprised me at a show in Philly. He gave Duncan to the sound man who brought it back stage, and now I have Duncan. So he’s kind of special to me.

DS: If you could choose how you die, how would you choose?

AD: Not freezing to death, and not in an airplane, because I’m afraid of flying. Painlessly, like most people. In my sleep when I’m so old and senile I don’t know what hit me. I’d like to get real old.

DS: Would you be an older woman with long hair or short hair?

AD: I guess short hair, because long hair looks a little witchy on old people.

DS: Who are you supporting for President?

AD: I’m torn between Obama and Hillary. Someone who is going to win, so I guess Hillary.

DS: You don’t think Obama would have a chance of winning?

AD: I don’t know. If he did, I would support Barack. I don’t really care; either of those would make me happy.

DS: What trait do you value most in your friends?

AD: Kindness.

DS: What trait do you deplore in other people?

AD: Arrogance. Showiness.

DS: Where else are you going on tour?

AD: Alaska in a few days. Fairbanks, Anchorage and all over the place. I’m a little nervous because I will be driving by myself and I have this vision that if I get hit by a moose then I could freeze to death.

DS: And you have to fly up there!

AD: Yeah, and I hate flying as well—so I’m really scared! [Laughs]

DS: Is there a big folk scene in Alaska?

AD: No, but I hear people are grateful if anyone makes it up there, especially in the winter. I think they are hungry for any kind of entertainment, no matter the quality. [Laughs] Someone came to us! I actually played there in June in this town called Seldovia, that has 300 people, and all 300 people came to my gig, so the next day I was so famous! Everyone knew me, the gas station attendant, everyone. It was surreal.

DS: So you had that sense of what Ani DiFranco must feel.

AD: Yeah! I was Paul McCartney. I thought this was what it must be like to be Bruce Springsteen, like I can’t even buy a stick of gum without being recognized.

DS: Did you like that?

AD: I think it would be awful to be that famous because you have moments when you just don’t feel like engaging.
21
Apr

Category:Featured article

Shortcut:WN:FA

Featured articles are selected by the community to represent the best of Wikinews. See the Featured Article Candidates page for nominations and discussions of candidate articles for this page. Or, subscribe to the RSS feed!

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17
Apr

How Social Media Can Lead To Impulse Buying

By Adriana Notton

Today, more people than ever are choosing to shop for products and services online. The result has been an increase in online impulse buying. The rise of impulse buying on the internet is due to a number of shopping features such as easy access, the availability of many more items, use of credit cards, and the success of marketing promotions and direct marketing. Businesses are now using social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook to market their products.. Businesses have been able to convince consumers to make more impulse purchases and therefore, increase their online spending.

With the astounding popularity of social media sites such as Facebook where there are about five hundred million users, businesses now have another way to interact directly with potential customers to promote their products and services and this interaction can reach millions of online users. Google, Facebook, Twitter, and other social media outlets make it easy for business marketers to track consumer preferences, behavior, and trends, which allow them to directly target users and offer products and services they specifically want. As well, their marketing strategy includes offering special deals to further encourage impulse buying.

When utilizing social media to reach online users, marketers have the ability to schedule specific campaigns when specific products are selling well. Since social media trends are changing all of the time, businesses can track the emerging trends, which give them the ability to launch promotions that will enable them to more successfully sell their product or service.

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Now, social media sites are offering easy shopping access. Companies are developing promotional tools to take advantage of impulse buying from the social media page or through user mobile devices. Companies are now beginning to provide a way for users to buy their products direct from the social media page and social media sites are implementing better filters which mean the targeted customer can be reached much more easily. As well, because social media is now moving into the mobile world, marketers can reach consumers wherever they are and at anytime of the day and night.

Now, as more and more consumers are sent sales and support information and get updates from social media, businesses can effectively tailor marketing campaigns based on their distinct shopping habits and preferences. Many analysts believe in the near future, social media pages will no longer be controlled by the user, but the marketer will control their social media followers and the advertisements and promotions that appear on their social media page.

Social media has changed the way businesses market their products and services. With a few clicks and a credit card, consumers can buy any time from anywhere. The financial implication is there will be an increased rate of impulse buying which will result in more people taking on more debt. Shopping online using social media has become so easy today, the consumer must develop prudent shopping skills to avoid accumulating too much credit card debt that can eventually result in financial ruin.

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8
Apr

Apple unveils iPhone 4, iOS 4 at Worldwide Developers Conference 2010

Tuesday, June 8, 2010

Yesterday, at this year’s Apple Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC), company CEO Steve Jobs unveiled iPhone 4, along with the new iOS 4 operating system for Apple mobile devices.

The announcement was long-awaited but not a very big surprise. In April, the technology blog Gizmodo obtained a prototype of the new phone and published details of it online. While introducing iPhone 4, at the annual conference, Jobs started by hinting at the incident, saying, “Stop me if you’ve already seen this.”

The new iPhone was praised by Jobs as “the biggest leap we’ve taken since the original iPhone.” It is only 9.3 millimetres (0.37 inches) thick, making it “the thinnest smartphone on the planet”, a 24 percent reduction from Apple’s previous model, the iPhone 3GS. Structure-wise, iPhone 4 has a new stainless steel frame, which acts as an antenna, supposedly boosting its signal reception abilities and possibly reducing the amount of dropped calls. It also has a new screen, dubbed a “retina display,” which displays images at 326 pixels per inch. During the keynote, Jobs demoed the device’s new internal gyroscope as well. Even though it now uses Apple’s faster A4 processor (first used in its iPad tablet), iPhone 4 has a claimed seven hours of 3G talk time, up two hours from the 3GS.

In addition to its design features, Jobs showed off iPhone 4’s new video calling abilities. This feature is called FaceTime, and connects with other iPhone 4s via Wi-Fi. The phone has two cameras: one on the front for video chats, and one on the back for taking pictures and other videos. The rear camera has a resolution of five megapixels, is capable of recording high-definition video, and has an LED flash.

The iPhone 4 will use Apple’s latest mobile operating system, iOS 4. Formerly “iPhone OS,” iOS 4 was first introduced by Apple in April, and includes multitasking capabilities. Jobs called the new software “the most advanced mobile operating system in the world.” iOS will support Apple’s new mobile advertising service, iAd, which goes live on July 1.

iPhone 4 will be available on June 24 in the United States, United Kingdom, France, Germany, and Japan. It comes in two colors—black and white—and two storage capacities. The 16GB version is priced at US$199 and the 32GB version at US$299. The iPhone 3GS’s price will be reduced to US$99, and the iPhone 3G will be discontinued. iOS will be available as a free software update to users of compatible older Apple devices (including the 3GS) on June 21. In the U.S., iPhone 4 will only be available on AT&T‘s cellular network, despite calls for Apple to let the iPhone be used on other carriers, such as Verizon.

Competition-wise, the BlackBerry mobile device is still the most popular smartphone right now. Apple is also facing some serious competition from web giant Google’s Android operating system, as well as Palm‘s webOS. Earlier this year, Android phones managed to outsell iPhones. iPhone users, however, account for over half of those surfing the Internet on a mobile browser in the U.S. Jobs also noted that over five billion iOS applications, commonly called “apps,” have been purchased from Apple’s App Store. The App Store currently has around 225,000 different apps for sale.